November looks fuzzy

by Hints with Heloise

Dear Readers: OK, guys, it's time to get ready for NO-SHAVE NOVEMBER. Likely, you'll soon begin to see many fuzzy faces out there, and you'll probably wonder, "What's going on?"
During November, participants forgo shaving and take the money they would have spent on shaving and donate it for cancer research and education.
The idea is to cherish your hair, which cancer patients can sometimes lose during treatment.
Starting a conversation is a good way to grow awareness. Ask at the office if growing a beard is OK.
Check out www.noshave.org for more information. - Heloise
P.S. No-Shave November was started officially 10 years ago in Chicago by a family who'd lost their dad to colon cancer.

SALUTATION OBFUSCATION

Dear Readers: Here are some follow-ups on the befuddlement of using "Dear" in a business letter. - Heloise
"Your column is enjoyed daily via the Uniontown, Pa., Herald-Standard. Your item about the use of 'Dear' in a business letter might benefit from the explanation that the word has evolved over the centuries and has several meanings, some of which have been lost to time.
"Prior to the 20th century, one of these now-obsolete meanings of 'dear' was 'noble.' 'Dear Sir' (or 'Madam' or surname) might be said today as 'Noble Sir.' Another extrapolation might include 'Honorable Sir.'" - David K., Farmington, Pa.
"In response to the reader who asked if 'Dear' is still a good salutation for a letter, I thought I would pass on another option.
"I have started using 'Greetings' as the salutation for emails and letters. It is friendly and less 'dated' than 'Dear.' I read your column in The Columbian." - Janet S., Battle Ground, Wash.

SAFETY DATA

Dear Heloise: What can you tell me about the material safety data sheet? What is it? Where can I get one? - A Reader, Toledo, Ohio
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration, a division of the U.S. Department of Labor, requires the manufacturers of chemicals to provide an easy-to-read safety data sheet (SDS), formally called the material safety data sheet.
The SDS provides info about the product, its makeup, what to do if the product spills, how to store the product and its date of manufacture, among many other things.
The SDS should be available through the product's website, or there is normally a phone number on the packaging that you can call to request the SDS. -- Heloise

SALT STORAGE

Dear Readers: Save the items used to tackle icy sidewalks (sand, rock salt and melting agents) in gallon plastic milk jugs. Label each one. The products will remain dry, fresh and easier to dispense. Keep them handy by the door on your way out to the car. - Heloise

HIDDEN BLANKET

Dear Heloise: I like to have my blankets within reach this time of year when temperatures can vary. But when the weather warms up, storing all those blankets takes up a lot of space.
I fold them flat and tuck them between my mattress and box spring. - Mandy B. in Atlanta

STORING WINES

Dear Heloise: I'm having a debate with my husband about storing wine. What are some of the do's and don'ts? - Wynona D., Evansville, Ind.
Wynona, a wine rack sitting on a kitchen counter might look cool, but actually, wine should not be stored in the warmest room in the house, where heat can ruin the wine's taste. You also need to keep the bottles still, with no vibrations, so on top of the refrigerator is a no-no. Overall, wines need to be kept in a cool, dry place with little or no sunlight. - Heloise

ADDING SOMEONE TO YOUR HOME DEED

Dear Heloise: If someone you know is thinking of adding a person to the deed on their home, they should stop and think. First, it should never be done without the legal advice and assistance of a lawyer. Once you add someone, it's very difficult to remove the person from your deed. If he or she has financial troubles later, a claim can be made against part or all of your house. Some states allow the other person to sell the share of ownership to a total stranger. My husband and I discovered all this the hard way. - Brenda and Doug in Florida

MAKEUP HINTS

Dear Heloise: Moisturizers are actually designed to keep moisture in the skin, not necessarily to add moisture. The main function of any moisturizer is to keep your skin from drying out. It does that by retaining water in the outer layer of your skin, which helps it maintain a dewy look. And today, many moisturizers also include sunblock to help protect against skin cancer. When selecting a moisturizer, always look for one that is fragrance-free. - Karen G., Concord, N.H.


Send a money-saving or timesaving hint to Heloise, P.O. Box 795001, San Antonio, TX 78279-5001, or you can fax it to 1-210-HELOISE or email it to Heloise@Heloise.com. I can't answer your letter personally but will use the best hints received in my column. (c)2019 by King Features Syndicate Inc.