Regulatory Insiders Warn of Flaw in 98 of 99 US Reactors

John LaForge

Tons of soil, leaves, and forest ‘litter’ radioactively poisoned by fallout from Fukushima’s three reactor disasters await disposal. After being scraped up and collected in 1-cubic-meter plastic bags, the government says as of Sept. 2015 at least 9.16 million bags are stacked at 114,700 sites in Fukushima Prefecture. (http://yournewswire.com/nine-million-bags-of-nuclear-waste-piled-up-in-fukushima/) 
Tons of soil, leaves, and forest ‘litter’ radioactively poisoned by fallout from Fukushima’s three reactor disasters await disposal. After being scraped up and collected in 1-cubic-meter plastic bags, the government says as of Sept. 2015 at least 9.16 million bags are stacked at 114,700 sites in Fukushima Prefecture. (http://yournewswire.com/nine-million-bags-of-nuclear-waste-piled-up-in-fukushima/) 

On March 1, seven inside experts currently at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) went public with a warning that nearly every US nuclear power reactor have flawed emergency cooling electrical systems that could spark radiation disasters at all of them.

In an extraordinary action, seven active-duty NRC engineers filed a formal petition with the NRC’s Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulations (ONRR) Feb. 19. The insiders warned that 98 out of 99 operating reactors in the US have a cooling system defect that make them vulnerable to loss-of-coolant disasters. Loss-of-coolant caused over-heating, fuel melting, and major radiation releases at Windscale in England, Santa Suzanna in Calif., Three Mile Island in Penn., Chernobyl in Ukraine, and at Fukushima-Daiichi in Japan.

The extremely rare petition by the on-duty NRC engineers (five from Maryland, one from Louisiana, one from W. Virginia) should raise more than just eyebrows -- it should raise the hair on your neck.

According to a report by Reuters, the whistleblowers wrote that the reactor flaw makes nearly all US reactors “vulnerable to so-called open-phase events in which an unbalanced voltage, such as an electrical short, could cause motors to burn out and reduce the ability of a reactor’s emergency cooling system to function. If the motors are burned out, backup electricity systems would be of little help.”

The engineers’ petition says 13 such events struck reactors worldwide in the past 14 years.

The NRC formally responded March 21 with a letter saying the commission would accept the petition, and take the experts’ warning under advisement.

The engineers had demanded that short of immediately resolving the distribution problem, the NRC should shut down all US reactors pending repairs. The NRC’s reply notes that reactor operators are currently working to implement a fix to the “open-phase” electrical glitch, and must be in compliance by February 2019, three years from now.

However, the commission denied the petitioners’ “request for immediate action,” and the ONRR said it would decide “within a reasonable amount of time” whether reactors were out of compliance with emergency cooling requirements. No timeline was presented by the ONRR.

A total loss of emergency back-up cooling at Fukushima-Daiichi in Japan, caused the first-ever and only triple reactor meltdown in history March 11, 2011. It has become the world’s worst radiation catastrophe in terms of population density, and in total cesium-137 released. (In July 2014, the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute reported that Fukushima’s meltdowns had dispersed between two to four times as much cesium-137 as the 1986 Chernobyl catastrophe.) Japanese officials have said it will take at least 40 years to recover from the triple meltdown at Fukushima.

The Reuters article, titled “U.S. NRC engineers urge fix for nuclear power stations,” notes that the NRC engineers’ petition is an method of formal warning “usually used by public interest groups to raise safety and other concerns with the commission.”

As author and nuclear power analyst Harvey Wasserman reported this month, the veteran NRC resident inspector Michael Peck was transferred from California’s Diablo Canyon reactor complex after he officially warned the NRC that the two huge Diablo reactors could not withstand shocks that could be delivered by any of the 12 nearby earthquake faults. “Peck’s report was ignored,” Wasserman reported, “It only became public after an intense independent investigation by Friends of the Earth and other green groups.”

In the case of the seven NRC engineers’ public alarm, the NRC has again chosen risk-taking, rolling the dice with its fingers crossed.